Sunday, February 26, 2017

Role Models


This Day In Women's History



March 3, 1913 – The suffrage parade in Washington, D.C. draws thousands of people. It is organized by a committee led by Alice Paul and Lucy Burns. The parade is led by Inez Milholland on a white horse.

Taken from: http://todayinwomenshistory.saintssistersandsluts.com/march/march-3/

This Day In Women's History



March 2, 1903 – In New York City the Martha Washington Hotel opens, becoming the first hotel exclusively for women.

Taken from: http://todayinwomenshistory.saintssistersandsluts.com/march/march-2/


This Day In Women's History



1692 – The Salem Witch Trials begin when Sarah Good, Sarah Osborne and Tituba are brought before local magistrates.

Taken from: http://todayinwomenshistory.saintssistersandsluts.com/march/march-1/


March is Women's History Month!


Here is a great article about how the month started:

This Day In Black History



Jazz great Thelonious Monk covered Time magazine on Feb. 28, 1964.


Taken from: http://www.bet.com/news/national/2014/02/28/this-day-in-black-history-feb-28-1964.html




This Day In Black History



– On this day in 1902, the first black soloist to perform at The White House, Marian Anderson, was born.

Taken from: http://www.blackenterprise.com/functional/black-history-month/black-history-month-facts-of-the-day-feb-27/


This Day In Black History



Fantastic book written by his parents!




Saturday, February 25, 2017

Oscar Moments by African Americans

In honor of Black History:







This Day In Black History



Hiram Rhodes Revels broke a color barrier in U.S. government when he became the first African-American senator on Feb. 25, 1870. Revels moved to Mississippi after the Civil War and was elected to one of the state's vacant U.S. Senate seats before they rejoined the Union. 

Taken from: http://www.bet.com/news/national/2013/02/25/this-day-in-black-history-feb-25-1870.html


This Day In Black History





This Day In Black History



On February 23: Feb. 23, 1965 - Constance Baker Motley elected Manhattan Borough president, the highest elective office held by a black woman in a major American city.

Taken from: https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/nrcs141p2_015471.pdf


Movies about African American History

I Love Movies!  Tomorrow are the Oscars!  In Honor of that here are some great movies about African American History!





This Day In Black History



This Day In Black History


Feb. 21, 1965

Human rights activist Malcolm X was assassinated on Feb. 21, 1965.


Taken from: http://www.bet.com/news/national/2015/02/21/this-day-in-black-history-feb-21-1965.html

Monday, February 20, 2017

This Day In Black History


Continue reading February 20: This Day in Black History

Continue reading February 20: This Day in Black History

Sunday, February 19, 2017

1921 Tulsa Race Riot


This Day In Black History



February 19 -On this day, the first Pan-African Congress, organized by W.E.B. Du Bois, was held in Paris, France in 1919. The Congress was a series of meetings held from 1919-1994 to address issues facing Africa as a result of European colonization. One of the demands of the group was to end colonial rule and racial discrimination. Fifty-seven delegates from 15 countries attended the first meeting.

Taken from: http://www.bet.com/news/national/2012/02/19/this-day-in-black-history-feb-19-1919.html

Saturday, February 18, 2017

BTW National Merit Scholars


National Merit Finalist list came out this last week!  BTW has 7, and we are the only TPS School that had some! So proud of Booker T!  You guys maze me everyday!  Congrats!!!


This Day In Black History


February 18th - Happy 52nd Birthday Dr. Dre!

Friday, February 17, 2017

Do Not Be Afraid of Change


This Day In Black History




This Day In Black History


Original Gangster rapper Ice-T born (1958)


Taken from: http://blackhistorydaily.com/on_this_day/February_16/

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

This Day In Black History


Celebrated pianist, singer and television host Nat King Cole dies from lung cancer at 45-years-old. Cole, who first rose to stardom as a jazz pianist, churned out numerous hits, including "Nature Boy," "Mona Lisa," and "Unforgettable.” King also became the first African-American to host a television show, The Nat "King" Cole Show in 1965.

Taken from: http://www.bet.com/news/national/2012/02/15/this-day-in-black-history-feb-15-1965.html

This Day In Black History


Black History Month: February 14, 1818 – Birthday of Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass was born into slavery as Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey on February 14, 1818 (or at least, he chose this date as his birthday, since the exact date was unknown). If you take the time to read some of his speeches, you will understand why he is so impressive. His political and legal analyses are relevant even to this day.
As the Oxford African American Studies Center tells the story, “Despite his situation, Frederick managed to learn to read and write, sometimes by bribing white boys into teaching him in exchange for bits of bread. At the age of about twelve, he acquired a copy of the Columbian Orator, a book of famous speeches that formed the basis for his later skills as an outstanding public lecturer. After he gained basic literacy, Frederick began to reach out to others, assisting his fellow slaves to read and operating a forbidden Sunday school. As he gained more knowledge of the world at large, he could no longer passively submit to a life of slavery. In September 1838, he borrowed the identification papers of a free black sailor and boarded a train for the North. Locating in New Bedford, Massachusetts, he took the name Frederick Douglass, after a character in Sir Walter Scott’s epic poem, The Lady in the Lake.”
Taken from: https://rhapsodyinbooks.wordpress.com/2010/02/14/black-history-month-february-14-1818-birthday-of-frederick-douglass/

Sunday, February 12, 2017

The Bookish Football Player


I saw this this weekend and it warmed my heart!  Had to share!




This Day In Black History


February 13, 1920
Andrew "Rube" Foster, who is hailed as the “Father of Black Baseball” organizes the first baseball league for African-Americans, the Negro National League in Kansas City, Missouri.  The NNL operated successfully until 1931

Taken from: http://www.bet.com/news/national/2012/02/13/this-day-in-black-history-feb-13-1920.html

This Day In Black History



1962 - Bus boycott started in Macon, Georgia

Bus boycott started in Macon, Georgia

Taken from: http://www.blackfacts.com/


Saturday, February 11, 2017

Be Willing To Be Uncomfortable


This Day In Black History


February 11, 1990
Nelson Mandela's greatest pleasure, his most private moment, is watching the sun set with the music of Handel or Tchaikovsky playing. Locked up in his cell during daylight hours, deprived of music, both these simple pleasures were denied him for decades. With his fellow prisoners, concerts were organised when possible, particularly at Christmas time, where they would sing. Nelson Mandela finds music very uplifting, and takes a keen interest not only in European classical music but also in African choral music and the many talents in South African music. But one voice stands out above all - that of Paul Robeson, whom he describes as our hero. The years in jail reinforced habits that were already entrenched: the disciplined eating regime of an athlete began in the 1940s, as did the early morning exercise. Still today Nelson Mandela is up by 4.30am, irrespective of how late he has worked the previous evening. By 5am he has begun his exercise routine that lasts at least an hour. Breakfast is by 6.30, when the days newspapers are read. The day s work has begun. With a standard working day of at least 12 hours, time management is critical and Nelson Mandela is extremely impatient with unpunctuality, regarding it as insulting to those you are dealing with. When speaking of the extensive travelling he has undertaken since his release from prison, Nelson Mandela says: I was helped when preparing for my release by the biography of Pandit Nehru, who wrote of what happens when you leave jail. My daughter Zinzi says that she grew up without a father, who, when he returned, became a father of the nation. This has placed a great responsibility of my shoulders. And wherever I travel, I immediately begin to miss the familiar - the mine dumps, the colour and smell that is uniquely South African, and, above all, the people. I do not like to be away for any length of time. For me, there is no place like home. Mandela accepted the Nobel Peace Prize as an accolade to all people who have worked for peace and stood against racism. It was as much an award to his person as it was to the ANC and all South Africa s people. In particular, he regards it as a tribute to the people of Norway who stood against apartheid while many in the world were silent. We know it was Norway that provided resources for farming; thereby enabling us to grow food; resources for education and vocational training and the provision of accommodation over the years in exile. The reward for all this sacrifice will be the attainment of freedom and democracy in South Africa, in an open society which respects the rights of all individuals. That goal is now in sight, and we have to thank the people and governments of Norway and Sweden for the tremendous role they played. Personal Tastes Breakfast of plain porridge, with fresh fruit and fresh milk. A favourite is the traditionally prepared meat of a freshly slaughtered sheep, and the delicacy Amarhewu (fermented corn-meal).

Taken from: http://www.blackfacts.com/



Friday, February 10, 2017

This Day In Black History



February 10, 1992

On this date: 
Alex Haley ~ (author of Roots) dies (Category : People)

Taken from: http://www.dayinblackhistory.com/showarticle3200.aspx

Thursday, February 9, 2017

This Day In Black History


February 9, 1906
Poet Paul Lawrence Dunbar dies in Dayton, Ohio. He was 33. Dunbar is credited with being the first Black poet to use African dialect in his work.

Taken from: http://www.bet.com/news/national/2012/02/09/this-day-in-black-history-feb-9-1906.html

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Aid to the Jim Crow South


Jim Crow South lasted from 1865 to the 1960s with the coming of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s.  One can understand why there was a Civil Rights Movement when you know the history.  Jim Crow separated the races in the South, and created a horrible reality if you were not White.  There were some things to help the colored of the South live their life without fear.  


One of the many things created to help African Americans and other minorities during this horrific time was the Green Book.  A motorist guide.  It is hard to imagine there would be places you could not go.  This book would let the reader know what gas stations, restaurants, and hotels they could stop at safely!

This Day In Black History





Tuesday, February 7, 2017

This Day In Black History


Dr. Carter G. Woodson, who is considered a pioneer in the study of African-American history and is known as “The Father of Black History,” designated the second week of February as Negro History Week in 1926. In 1976, Negro History Week would be expanded to the entire month of February, or Black History Month. Woodson, a son of former slaves who eventually earned a PhD from Harvard, chose the second week of February as it marked the birthday of abolitionist Frederick Douglass (Feb. 14) and President Abraham Lincoln (Feb. 12), who signed the Emancipation Proclamation abolishing slavery in the southern states.

Taken from: http://www.bet.com/news/national/2012/02/07/this-day-in-black-history-feb-7-1926.html

Monday, February 6, 2017

This Day In Black History



Before he was the first African-American elected as president of the United States, then-Harvard student Barack Obama was named the first African-American president of the Harvard Law Review on this day on February 6, 1990. The role is considered the highest student position at Harvard Law School.

Taken from: http://www.bet.com/news/national/2012/02/06/this-day-in-black-history-feb-6-1990.html

Sunday, February 5, 2017

Children are Powerful!


In 1963 the  Civil Rights Movement was at a standstill.  Not a lot of movement.  Dr. King brings the movement to Birmingham, Alabama.  They needed a change,  and this was a perfect new staging ground.  Birmingham was the most segregated city in America in 1963.  There was also a lot of violence, and the city was called Bombingham!

In the begining of 1963 Dr. King and others agreed they needed  to use children.  Children represent innocence, and to all people they are untouchable!  A children's march is organized, and made a difference.  At this march the children were attacked by dogs and fire hoses!  The  press was there taking pictures.  When America saw the images they were horrified, and demanded change!



Great documentary about the Children's  March

Bolstered by the Children's March, Dr. King organized a march on Washington that ended at Lincoln Memorial.  There he gave his famous "I Have A Dream Speech."


If you have not watched this - please do!  It is worth the watch!

In September 1963 The Children made one more sacrifice.  A Baptist church was having a special Children program when a bomb blew the Church apart killing 4 little girls!  No one took responsibilty for this moment, or held responsible.  Though many people blamed the KKK.

The Children's March made a difference!  It helped America open her eyes to the injustice American citizens were facing everyday!


Powerful Song - Please Listen!








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